COVID-19 Updates

ATTENTION DUNDALK PEDIATRIC PATIENTS 

WE ARE HERE FOR YOU!

While we are not accepting walk-ins, we do have scheduling options available based upon your need:

  • Sick appointments (afternoons only and on Saturday at 9 am – 1 pm)
  • Telemedicine (video) appointments
  • Telephone advice

We will continue to see patients for well-child appointments: priority to infants and young children who need vaccinations.

Download the information above as an image flyer.

New Office Hours

Our office hours have temporarily changed due to the COVID-19 Pandemic:

Monday 9:00am – 5:00pm
Tuesday 9:00am – 5:00pm
Wednesday 9:00am – 5:00pm
Thursday 9:00am – 5:00pm
Friday 9:00am – 5:00pm
Saturday 9:00am – 1:00pm

The office will close 1:00 – 2:00 pm, Monday – Friday for staff education. WE ARE HERE FOR YOU! 410-284-1133

We are NOT offering walk-in sessions.

For scheduled appointments we are asking:

  • 1 adult to accompany the child to the appointment.
  • Siblings and/or additional family members will be asked to wait in the car.

Download this information as a PDF.

TIPS FOR A GREAT TELEMEDICINE VISIT


With the physicians and nurse practitioners of Dundalk Pediatrics

  1. Have your child with you in a well-lit room that is as quiet and free of distractions as possible. We get it… you’re at home, so do your best. If we end up seeing your other children or your pets, that’s ok! (and even fun for us to see them!)
  2. Visits work best if you use your smartphone. We will text you with a link – log in 5 – 10 minutes before your scheduled appointment time. Log in using the patient’s name.
  3. Tools to have available:
    1. A thermometer
    2. A flashlight or other light source (so we can look at your child’s throat)
    3. Your child’s weight or a scale
    4. The name/location of your pharmacy
  4. The doctor or nurse practitioner will have you help with your child’s physical exam. We might have you get them to say “ahh,” take their temperature, or show us a rash, among other things.
  5. Don’t be nervous to ask questions and have your child do the same. It might be fun for your child to show us their favorite toy or introduce their pet. Those things will help your child be more comfortable with the visit.

We’re excited to offer this new service!
Questions or Concerns?
Please don’t hesitate to call us!

Download this information as a PDF.

COVID-19 FAQs


What is the treatment for COVID-19?

There is no vaccine or specific treatment for COVID-19. Most people will get better on their own. However, you can relieve your symptoms by:

  • Taking over-the-counter medicines such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen for pain, fever, and cough. Do not give aspirin to children. Do not give cough medicine to children under 4.
  • Using a room humidifier or taking a hot shower to help ease a sore throat and cough
  • Getting plenty of rest
  • Drinking fluids

If you are worried about your symptoms, contact your health care provider.

Can COVID-19 be prevented?

The best way to reduce your risk of getting an infection or spreading it to others is by:

  • Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitize with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your face, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick
  • Cleaning and disinfecting surfaces that you frequently touch
  • Covering coughs and sneezes with a tissue. Then throw away the tissue and wash your hands.
  • Staying home when sick

Download this information as a PDF.

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-10) Information

What are coronavirus infections?

Coronaviruses are a group of common viruses. Most people get infected with human coronaviruses at some time in their life. They usually cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory infections, like the common cold. But they can also cause more severe illnesses such as bronchitis and pneumonia.

There are several different types of human coronaviruses, including a new type of coronavirus known as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

COVID-19 is a new disease and we are still learning how it spreads, the severity of illness it causes, and to what extent it may spread in the United States.

How is COVID-19 spread?

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
  • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes, and you breathe it in. Most often, you need to be close to the person (within 6 feet) for it to spread this way.

It might be possible to get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching your own mouth, nose, or possibly your eyes. But this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

Can someone spread the virus without being sick?

  • People are thought to be most contagious when they are the sickest.
  • Some spread might be possible before people show symptoms but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

COVID-19 can cause respiratory illness that ranges from mild to severe. The symptoms usually start between 2 to 14 days after you get infected. Commonly reported symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath/trouble breathing
  • Pneumonia​​

Severe infections are more common in people with heart or lung diseases, people with weakened immune systems, infants, and older adults.

It’s not too late to get your flu shot!  While the influenza vaccine does not protect against coronavirus infection, it can help keep you healthy during the flu season.

Is the virus more dangerous to children?

There is no evidence that children are more susceptible. In fact, there are fewer cases reported in children than adults. Limited reports suggest that children with confirmed COVID-19 may present with milder symptoms than adults or older people.

However, as with other respiratory illnesses, certain populations of children may be at increased risk of severe infection, such as children with chronic health conditions.

What is the treatment for COVID-19?

There is no vaccine or specific treatment for COVID-19. Most people will get better on their own. However, you can relieve your symptoms by:

  • Taking over-the-counter medicines such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen for pain, fever, and cough. Do not give aspirin to children. Do not give cough medicine to children under 4.
  • Using a room humidifier or taking a hot shower to help ease a sore throat and cough
  • Getting plenty of rest
  • Drinking fluids

If you are worried about your symptoms, contact your health care provider.

Can COVID-19 be prevented?

The best way to reduce your risk of getting an infection or spreading it to others is by:

  • Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoiding touching your face, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands
  • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick
  • Cleaning and disinfecting surfaces that you frequently touch
  • Covering coughs and sneezes with a tissue. Then throw away the tissue and wash your hands.
  • Staying home when sick

The CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a face mask to protect themselves from respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19. You should only wear a mask if recommended by your healthcare provider.

Facemasks should be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to others. The use of facemasks is also essential for health workers and people who are taking care of someone in close settings (at home or in a health care facility).


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